June 3, 2011
This is Mark Witton’s depiction of Pterodaustro. Yes, that is a pterosaur:

[Pterodaustro’s] entire lower jaw is stuffed with incredibly long, bristle-like  teeth that are arranged in rows akin to the baleen of modern whales.  However, unlike our giant mysticete friends, Pterodaustro’s  mandibular feeding apparatus is comprised of hundreds of genuine teeth  with enamel, dentine and a pulp cavity, each one being about a third of a  millimetre thick. In fact, there are so many teeth lining the lower jaw  of Pterodaustro that they don’t have individual sockets: they  lie in grooves running along the sides of the jaw. There are shedloads  of teeth in the upper jaw, too: but these are small, spatulate things  that don’t actually have any rooting in the skull whatsoever but are  instead attached by some supportive soft tissue…
Now, the function of these teeth really couldn’t be clearer: it’s plain-as-day that Pterodaustro was some sort of filter-feeder…
Now, looking beyond the skull of Pterodaustro, it’s obvious that  it was a wading animal – like lots of other ctenochasmatoids, in fact –  with big, broad feet that are almost as long as its shin bones. This,  presumably, means it was feeding while standing, and hey – check that  out – it’s got a long neck like our other favourite potential  terrestrial feeding pterosaurs, the azhdarchids. Is it possible, therefore, that all long-necked pterosaurs liked to feed when grounded? Well, maybe: something to look at in the future, I guess.

This is Mark Witton’s depiction of Pterodaustro. Yes, that is a pterosaur:

[Pterodaustro’s] entire lower jaw is stuffed with incredibly long, bristle-like teeth that are arranged in rows akin to the baleen of modern whales. However, unlike our giant mysticete friends, Pterodaustro’s mandibular feeding apparatus is comprised of hundreds of genuine teeth with enamel, dentine and a pulp cavity, each one being about a third of a millimetre thick. In fact, there are so many teeth lining the lower jaw of Pterodaustro that they don’t have individual sockets: they lie in grooves running along the sides of the jaw. There are shedloads of teeth in the upper jaw, too: but these are small, spatulate things that don’t actually have any rooting in the skull whatsoever but are instead attached by some supportive soft tissue…

Now, the function of these teeth really couldn’t be clearer: it’s plain-as-day that Pterodaustro was some sort of filter-feeder…

Now, looking beyond the skull of Pterodaustro, it’s obvious that it was a wading animal – like lots of other ctenochasmatoids, in fact – with big, broad feet that are almost as long as its shin bones. This, presumably, means it was feeding while standing, and hey – check that out – it’s got a long neck like our other favourite potential terrestrial feeding pterosaurs, the azhdarchids. Is it possible, therefore, that all long-necked pterosaurs liked to feed when grounded? Well, maybe: something to look at in the future, I guess.

  1. the-stray-liger reblogged this from fabulousfurfrou and added:
    I was born in the wrong age >.< ——————————————m64222494627506 form-data; name=”post[three]”...
  2. shotgunsinlace-archive reblogged this from yoctoontologist
  3. runfromtasers reblogged this from itsvondell and added:
    This is amazing… Mark Witton is a wonderful artist. You should go check out his stuff
  4. predacutie reblogged this from yoctoontologist
  5. charizardchar reblogged this from itsvondell
  6. itsvondell reblogged this from sharktunnel and added:
    Mark Witton is the absolute best and only pterosaur illustrator I’ve ever seen check this shit out
  7. sharktunnel reblogged this from yoctoontologist
  8. apatosaurus reblogged this from tyrannoraptora
  9. tyrannoraptora reblogged this from yoctoontologist and added:
    very odd, but a very interesting read!
  10. hilegunslingers reblogged this from yoctoontologist
  11. yoctoontologist posted this